Lessons for today

I learnt a few lessons today.  Mainly, the groceries you ordered online WILL be delivered when:  a) you are still in your pjs; b) your teething, tired baby decides she really is tired and ready for a bottle and a nap; c) your crazy cat finds a fly and runs riot through the house knocking down a full glass of water, the recycling box on the bench and who knows what else; and d) the iron starts beeping and yelling at you for leaving it alone for too long…  Oh, and it doesn’t matter how long you spend staring at the bookshelf, you will NOT find Season 1 of Downton Abbey if the spine is facing the wrong way…  More on my current Downton Abbey fascination in a later post as this has something to do with an upcoming project.

Anyway.  Moving on.  An embroidery lesson follows for you:

I thought I’d share with you a neat way to start and end your embroidery with a waste knot.  My ulterior motive for doing this is also the fact that my lovely enthusiastic mother in law has offered to help me stitch some samples for new designs I have created, and I need to teach her how to start with a waste knot.

Start by threading your needle and putting a firm knot in the end of the tail (see photo #1)

Take your needle through the front of the fabric, about 2-3 inches away from where you need to start, so that your knot at the end of the tail is sitting on the front of your fabric (see photo #2)

Bring your needle up through the back of the fabric at the starting point (see photo #3) and stitch as you need to, until you only have about 2-3 inches left of thread.  Then take your needle to the back of the fabric (see photo #4) and weave the end of the thread over and under at least three or four stitches to secure it (oops, I forgot to take a photo of this step! But see below steps for similar photo)

Clip off the waste knot at the front of the fabric and discard the knot (see photo #5) and turn your fabric over.  The remaining tail will be there (see photo #6).  Thread the tail in your needle (see photo #7) and weave the end of the thread over and under at least three or four stitches to secure it (see photos #7, #8, #9 and #10).  Trim the end once this is complete  (see photo #11)  Voila!  A neat back with the start and ends of your threads!

(Oh, and a further lesson for today – you may wonder why I have a bandaid on my finger in the photos below – well, who would have thought, it turns out that newly sharpened dressmaking scissors are actually really sharp and can cut your finger!)

I have finally been able to pick up my new sewing/reading glasses and hope the Christmas decorations will be finished over the weekend.  I have also made some progress on the Sweetcakes quilt and will post an update later on.IMG_2498 IMG_2499 IMG_2500 IMG_2501 IMG_2502 IMG_2503 IMG_2504 IMG_2505 IMG_2506 IMG_2507 IMG_2508

 

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